Since 1992, ARCH has released an annual “Most Endangered” list to the public to raise awareness about threatened historic resources in our area. During the year, ARCH closely monitors these properties and places an emphasis on their preservation. Nominations for this list are taken from the public throughout the year, via an online nomination form found here.

 

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Brookview-Irvington Park HD

Included on the Endangered List once again, this National Register Historic District will be drastically altered when construction begins on the West State Boulevard realignment.

GE Broadway Campus

ARCH and community activists continue to advocate for this historic industrial campus which is threatened by vacancy, vandalism and demolition. Since the campus closed in 2014, one building has been demolished and the iconic sign was taken down due to vandalism.

FW Bible College Buildings: Schultz, Bethany and Hausser Halls

After a redevelopment proposal was abandoned last summer, the future of these three buildings, all vacant and associated with the Fort Wayne Bible College, is still unknown.

S.F. Bowser Administration Building, Creighton Avenue

The former headquarters of S.F. Bowser’s gas pump company and the remaining associated industrial buildings are threatened by demolition. Neighborhood residents are searching for a possible reuse strategy.

Fort Wayne Park Resources: Foster Park Pavilion No. 3 and Historic Footbridges

Set along the St. Mary’s River in West Foster Park, Pavilion No. 3 has become an easy target for graffiti and is in need of roof repairs. New Deal-era resources like this pavilion represent a threatened legacy in our public parks that transformed the role of parks in public life. An article in a local paper brought to light the plight of the historic footbridges in our local parks. In particular, the Mechanic Street Bridge has been closed and in need of significant repairs. Other footbridges, including those in Foster and Lawton parks are also in need of costly repairs.

Township Era Schools: Elmhurst High School

This vacant school was built as a township school and later expanded and absorbed by the Fort Wayne Community Schools system. Today, the building is threatened by vacancy and uncertainty over its future use.

C.F. Bleke Farmhouse, State Road 3

This brick Italianate farmhouse was recently sold as development property and its future is uncertain. Historic farmhouses in Allen County are a vanishing resource, threatened by demolition and new development.

Canal House, Superior Street

This vacant canal-era resource on Superior Street is flanked by a parking lot and vacant bus depot. With new developments planned in the area, there is concern about parking needs. The Canal House’s unique masonry construction would prevent it from being moved.

Streetcar Commercial Corridors: Lake Avenue and North Anthony Boulevard

These historic commercial corridors served streetcar riders throughout the city during the early 20th century. Now, some of these commercial areas suffer from underuse, changing traffic patterns and vacancy. At Lake Avenue and North Anthony Boulevard, a series of one story commercial buildings are underused and in need of repairs.

Paul Kinder House, West Washington Boulevard

This impressive Craftsman-style home is the only residential structure on a block that was identified as a potential site for a downtown arena. As discussions about the viability of a new arena continue, the fate of this house remains uncertain.

Rialto Theater, South Calhoun Street

The Reclamation Project announced their former home was for sale in early 2016. ARCH is hopeful a preservation-minded buyer will come forward to finish the rehabilitation of this South Calhoun Street gem.

FW Box Co. Art Moderne building, Superior and Harrison Streets

Early Riverfront Development plans call for the demotion of this Art Moderne industrial building, and the construction fence is already standing. This is the only building of this style downtown and it is one of three buildings in the National Register-eligible Fort Wayne Box Company complex.

ARCH is happy to note that three resources that were on the 2015 Endangered List do not appear this year. The Fort Wayne Parks Department has persistently worked to replace street tree canopies damaged by heavy storms and the emerald ash borer. Replanting street trees and removing damaged trees helps to restore the atmosphere of our city’s historic neighborhoods. Additionally, the Parks Department has started a campaign to repair historic statues in our parks. This spring, it was announced that the former Coca-Cola building on East Pontiac Street was awarded Low Income Housing Tax Credits. Developers plan to convert the building into 31 affordable housing in addition to new housing in the surrounding neighborhood. ARCH is looking forward to seeing this building put back into use.